Only in the bizarro world of Rick Santorum and his fruitcake followers. A little more than a month ago the piously-puritanical candidate for the Republican/Teabagger nomination said this during an attempt to clarify his position on abortion (h/t Wonkette):

“I’ve always, you know, I believe and I think the right approach is to accept this horribly created — in the sense of rape — but nevertheless a gift in a very broken way, the gift of human life, and accept what God has given you.”

A gift? Sure, and this gift was delivered through the gift of rape accompanied by the other wonderful God-given gifts of pain, anguish, fear, psychological terror and sometimes the gift of suicide. What a God. What a candidate.

Stretching a bit, does this mean Adolf Hitler was a gift as well?

Santorum is seriously twisted. The Repugs/Teabaggers deserve him. Truly a gift to the nation from God.

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14 Responses to The Gift of Rape

  1. Zach W says:

    Rick Santorum is an extremist, plain and simple, and he’d be a disaster for the GOP as their nominee.

  2. Graeme Zielinski says:

    Not looking good for Santorum-Romney closing.

  3. Zuma Bound says:

    “What a God. What a candidate.”

    Look, Phil, I realize that you’re an atheist and all, but I think that you’re making a mistake by conflating true Christianity with whatever it is that Santorum embraces, practices or espouses.”

    Having been a “doubting Thomas” for most of my adult life, I have recently begun to embrace the Christian faith. “Christians” like Santorum were historically one of my strongest arguments against Christianity. The faith which I now embrace came to me by way of some truly personal experiences, and through understanding, among other things, that false Christians are just that, false Christians.

    I don’t profess to be down with every Christian precept, things like “Judgment Day” and all that. My journey to faith has been an intensely personal one, entirely unencumbered by doctrine, and I’m pretty sure that many who purport to be Christians would reject the sanctity of the path that I am on.

    That said, if there is such a thing as “Judgment Day”, I know, in my heart of hearts, that God will judge people like Rick Santorum and the Christian Right in the harshest way imaginable.

    • Zach W says:

      There’s no Phil here.

      • Zuma Bound says:

        (*laughing*) Oops. I must have just come from reading one of Phil’s posts on economics, and it kind of sounded like something Phil might say. . .

        Anyway, with apologies to Phil (who I doubt would disagree with what Other Side had to say) for attributing Other Side’s comment to him, I guess that I’ll just have to try again because the substantive point that I was trying to make is an important one:

        @ Other Side

        Other Side: “What a God. What a candidate.”

        Look, Other Side, I think that you’re making a mistake by conflating true Christianity with whatever it is that Santorum embraces, practices or espouses.”

        Having been a “doubting Thomas” for most of my adult life, I have recently begun to embrace the Christian faith. “Christians” like Santorum were historically one of my strongest arguments against Christianity. The faith which I now embrace came to me by way of some truly personal experiences, and through understanding, among other things, that false Christians are just that, false Christians.

        I don’t profess to be down with every Christian precept, things like “Judgment Day” and all that. My journey to faith has been an intensely personal one, entirely unencumbered by doctrine, and I’m pretty sure that many who purport to be Christians would reject the sanctity of the path that I am on.

        That said, if there is such a thing as “Judgment Day”, I know, in my heart of hearts, that God will judge people like Rick Santorum and the Christian Right in the harshest way imaginable.

        I’ll be voting for the President on Election Day, and I’ll be celebrating his re-election the next day.

  4. james booth says:

    I’m a fiscally conservative pro choice atheist. (I know! How lonely is that??) And santorum better not be the nominee. But I fear libs will go vote for him tomorrow in Michigan and give him a win there.

  5. Other Side says:

    @ZB: Though I am a non-believer I am not intolerant of Christians or the faith of anyone else. In fact, I am a member of the Unitarian Universalist Church in Brookfield; a very tolerant and open-minded church in which people of all faiths (or non) are welcome. I have quite a few friends (and family members) who profess to Christianity. I love the gentle tenets of the faith in its purest form. What I do not like are those who use their faith as a cudgel. The God I was referring to is the God they believe exists; a spiteful and angry God that speaks only to them.

    Sorry if I offended you.

    • Zuma Bound says:

      Absolutely no offense taken, Other Side. I just thought that your point could have been better articulated.

      That said, we’re definitely on the same page about Santorum.

      As far as I’m concerned, Santorum and the Christian Right diminish Christianity in the same way that the Taliban and al-Qaida diminish Islam.

      Thank you for your thoughtful response

      • Zach W says:

        Count me in agreement with your statement that Santorum and the Christian right diminish Christianity in the same way the Taliban and al Qaeda diminish Islam. Extremism within any movement – whether religious, political, etc. – only serves to taint the entire movement, whether fairly or unfairly.

        Though I consider myself a Christian, I’m definitely not a Rick Santorum Christian, because I’m a bigger believer in social justice, equality, and forgiveness than he seems to be.

  6. Jan Tessier says:

    I don’t give a crap what a candidate’s religion might happen to be, or what he professes to believe. I give a crap about his/her conduct and visible morality. Actions still speak louder than words. Every once in a while, I have the privilege to give a tiny woman from Kenya a ride home. In her broken English, she tells me about her life. Then she blesses me in Arabic and kisses me and calls me her sister. She works two jobs, riding the bus to each. Occasionally, she misses the bus, which affords me a chance to view the world differently when I take her home. This woman’s religion is maligned by the Right. I’m an agnostic.

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