Mike Huckabee fails at Twitter

This is too funny not to share.

The Jesus I’ve read about in the Bible never struck me as a bigot, but I can’t say the same for Mike Huckabee.

16 comments to Mike Huckabee fails at Twitter

  • John Casper

    Great catch.

       0 likes

  • Jeffrey

    The Jesus I know did not waver from His values. Huckabee, however, cited a portion of Scripture where Jesus was weeping near the tomb of his friend Lazurus before resurrecting him. It was a hokey reference, for sure.

    That being said, Zach, you must not read much of the Bible. Jesus certainly does not hate homosexuals, but it is clear that sinful behavior (like any behavior that runs contrary to God’s will, including homosexuality) nailed him to the cross. He was quick to call sinners to repentance (the woman caught in the act of adultery in the Gospel of John), but did not condone the behaviors of the people leading sinful lives (he later told the same woman “Neither do I condemn you. Now go and sin no more.”).

    Liberalism has one god – self-interest. It can make its god whatever it wants it to be, but refuses to believe in or adhere to a code of absolutes. God is constant (“I AM who I AM”) and has no need to evolve to the times and wishes of sinful people. Rationalize all you want about homosexuality, but the fact remains it is a sin. Just as infidelity, theft, lying, speeding on the freeway, drunkenness, etc. are all sinful behaviors according to the Bible.

       0 likes

    • Jeffrey, are you a football fan?

         1 likes

    • John Casper

      Jeffrey, what they heck happened to Paul in his letter to Galatians?

      3:28″There is neither Jew nor Greek, there is neither slave[a] nor free, there is no male and female, for you are all one in Christ Jesus.”

      Sounds like a free pass for homosexuals?

      Jeffrey, you assert that “God is constant (“I AM who I AM”) and has no need to evolve to the times and wishes of sinful people.”

      How do you reconcile that with Matthew 15:24? “…I was sent only to the lost sheep of the house of Israel.”

      Do I have to go to Temple now? Is there any hope for the Gentiles?

         0 likes

    • John Casper

      Jeffrey, what’s up with Exodus 22:25?

      “If you lend money to any of my people with you who is poor, you shall not be like a moneylender to him, and you shall not exact interest from him.”

      If usury to poor people isn’t allowed, how do you expect Wall Street to stay so filthy rich?

         0 likes

  • Jeffrey

    John, you are taking the verses you cited far out of context. Galatians 3:28 was trying to clear up the bias that the Pharisaic Jews had regarding their status in the eyes of God. The Jews were the chosen people in that Christ was a descendant of the Jews. As a result, some of the early Christians had a problem with Paul preaching to the Gentiles (and, yes, slaves and women) because they had the problem of believing that all those groups were second-class citizens. As for Exodus 22:25, that was part of the Old Testament Mosaic law that was fulfilled by Christ. As was another related part where some of the harvested wheat was to be left in the field for the poor to gather. It is not a command that extends to the New Testament Christians, but that could be a dissertation topic in and of itself.

    And the reference you make to Matthew 15:24 is very misleading. He was testing the faith of a Gentile woman whose daughter was possessed by a demon. If you continue reading, he healed this woman’s daughter after praising her great faith. Christ himself was sent first to the Jews (he was born and raised in Israel), then to the Gentiles (the missionary work that he began in his own ministry then was followed by the Apostle Paul).

    And Zach, yes, I do enjoy watching my favorite teams, the Packers and Badgers. How about that new recruit from whom the Badgers got that verbal commitment? That ought to be exciting!

       0 likes

  • Jeffrey

    Also, to give another reference to the Apostle Paul’s letters, he addresses the topics of the misuse of sex and other potential vices in 1 Corinthians 6:9-11. The final verse (11) mentions that those who recognize their sin, ask for mercy, and embrace their forgiveness will not be held in judgment for their misdeeds. That is not the same as saying “gay is okay.” What it does say is that people who are unrepentant are in danger of turning away from God for eternity.

    That is what the Bible says and it is my set of beliefs. There are standards that do not “evolve with the times” that most liberals do not like because it damns some things as being “sinful,” which is a word that often gets you laughed at in liberal circles. There are absolutes and there are standards. Otherwise, what is morality without any kind of true center? It is whatever you make it to be.

       0 likes

    • John Casper

      Jeff: “Also, to give another reference to the Apostle Paul’s letters, he addresses the topics of the misuse of sex and other potential vices in 1 Corinthians 6:9-11.”

      So which one is the authentic Paul? Is it Galatians or Corinthians?

      He doesn’t mention women, so presumably he’s cool with lesbians.

      Jeff: “The final verse (11) mentions that those who recognize their sin, ask for mercy, and embrace their forgiveness will not be held in judgment for their misdeeds. ‘That is not the same as saying “gay is okay.’”

      Why because you assert it?

      Jeff: “What it does say is that people who are unrepentant are in danger of turning away from God for eternity.”

      It says what it says.

      Jeff: “That is what the Bible says and it is my set of beliefs. There are standards that do not “evolve with the times” that most liberals do not like because it damns some things as being “sinful,” which is a word that often gets you laughed at in liberal circles. There are absolutes and there are standards. Otherwise, what is morality without any kind of true center? It is whatever you make it to be.”

      Is your whole body intact? Are you missing anything?

      Matthew 5:29

      If your right eye causes you to sin, tear it out and throw it away. For it is better that you lose one of your members than that your whole body be thrown into hell. 30 And if your right hand causes you to sin, cut it off and throw it away. For it is better that you lose one of your members than that your whole body go into hell.

         0 likes

      • Jeffrey

        Actually, he does mention women. Read the book of Romans. Specifically chapter 1:26.

        I have read the entire Bible…several times. To explain some of the more intricate doctrine with one who rejects even the most basic principles is fruitless. You cite example after example of passages taken completely out of context because you don’t like being told that certain things are indeed evil in the eyes of God.

        I clearly do not have time to post on an internet comment board as John does, but I can answer a couple of things:

        1) Jesus’s public ministry: 3 years, by most estimates.
        2) The whole Old Testament was wrong: No.
        3) “Some” early Christians that had a problem with teaching the Gentiles: Peter (Acts 10-11), most Jews under the influence of the teachings of the Pharisees.
        4) Expiatory sacrifice: I don’t believe I brought that one up.
        5) “If Jesus was the fulfillment of Mosaic law, why didn’t the Jews defend him when the Romans hung him on the Cross? Didn’t they know?”: No, they rejected his message several times and brought him to the Romans because they believed he was blaspheming himself.
        6) Reference for Mosaic Law fulfillment: Luke 4:21 (after he had read a section of Isaiah detailing the pitiable state sinners have when they realize they cannot perfectly keep the Old Testament Law). This does not mean that “New Testament Christians” have a license to steal, so to speak, but rather the liberty to do good works out of love and thanks for God’s grace, not out of a self-serving interest to curry a favor to God or to earn “works righteousness.”
        7) Surprise at Jesus associating with a woman: John 4:27 (Jesus teaching a Samaritan woman who had had five husbands and was currently shacked up with a live-in boyfriend).
        8) The ol’ “turn-the-other-cheek” argument you referenced with Matthew 5:40: instruction on not engaging someone who unjustly accuses with an argument, but by “killing him with kindness.”
        9) The leftover grain and other crops: Leviticus 19:9-10, 23:22, Deuteronomy 24:19-22. The Moabite, Ruth, later took advantage of this as she was poor and a widow. She also met her future husband, Boaz, who owned the fields from which she was gathering the grain. Not sure of whether the grain was winter wheat or summer wheat. I’d have to get back to you on that. :)
        10) Self-mutilation (Matthew 5:29): My body is intact, but he is making a point by saying that you are best to remove yourself from situations that may further tempt you to indulge a vice. It would be unwise for an alcoholic, for example, to go on a brewery tour with his friends. He did not cut out his stomach and throw it away when Satan tempted him in the desert.
        11) Kafentzis offers: No idea. I do know that Alabama was recruiting him. Some of the Utah papers seemed pretty bummed that Utah or Utah State did not get him. I would imagine that a lot of schools were after him given his ridiculous performance as a high school sophomore.

        Not sure if I got all of them, but that is already 10 minutes more than I wanted to invest in responding on an internet blog.

           0 likes

        • John Casper

          Jeff, you said this: “That is what the Bible says and it is my set of beliefs.”

          Then you’ve left till last, Paul’s strongest denunciation of homosexuality, Romans.

          Evidently, Paul forgot about female homosexuality in his letter to the Corinthians. Is that because it was ok in Corinth, but not in Rome?

          Then you simply ignore Galatians, which contradicts Romans and Corinthians.

          Didn’t anyone ever teach you about the inerrancy of scripture? Which one is right? Which are wrong?

          You’re doing

             0 likes

        • John Casper

          1) Jesus’s public ministry: 3 years, by most estimates.

          You don’t sound like a guy who has even read scripture once.

          Matthew, Mark, and Luke all have one (1) Passover.

          John’s Gospel has three (3) Passovers.

          Who is right?

             0 likes

        • John Casper

          “4) Expiatory sacrifice: I don’t believe I brought that one up.”

          You claim to have read the Bible. Expiatory sacrifice refers to Jesus’ blood washing away our sins. Isn’t that important to you?

          John’s Gospel rejects expiatory sacrifice. “And the Word became flesh and dwelt among us,…” John 1:14

          Jesus saved us by being born. It was his birth that revealed God’s salvation. His death accomplished nothing.

          Mark, Luke, and Matthew all talk about expiatory sacrifice.

          Who is right?

             0 likes

        • John Casper

          “2) The whole Old Testament was wrong: No.”

          Excuse me for reading what you wrote: “As for Exodus 22:25, that was part of the Old Testament Mosaic law that was fulfilled by Christ.”

          Is Exodus 22:25 right or wrong?

             0 likes

    • John Casper

      Jeff, how long was Jesus’ public ministry?

      Which of the four canonical Gospels explicitly rejects “expiatory sacrifice?”

         0 likes

  • John Casper

    Jeff: “John, you are taking the verses you cited far out of context.”

    Nope.

    Jeff: “Galatians 3:28 was trying to clear up the bias that the Pharisaic Jews had regarding their status in the eyes of God.”

    Would love to see a link that the Pharisees were the only folks in the Temple who thought Hebrews were “chosen” by God.

    Jeff: “The Jews were the chosen people in that Christ was a descendant of the Jews.”

    Wow! According to Jeff, the whole Old Testament/Hebrew scriptures is wrong.

    “For you are a holy people to YHWH your God, and God has chosen you to be his treasured people from all the nations that are on the face of the earth.” Deuteronomy 14:2,

    Jeff: “As a result, some of the early Christians had a problem with Paul preaching to the Gentiles…”

    Please be more specific about which “early Christians” had a problem with it and which did not.

    Jeff “(and, yes, slaves”

    Eureka! Jesus was an abolitionist! Do you perchance have a scriptural reference?

    Jeff: “and women) because they had the problem of believing that all those groups were second-class citizens.”

    Back in the first century, Jesus started “NOW,” and was campaigning for the ERA.

    Do you perchance have a scriptural reference to the problems “they” had with Jesus’ relationships with women as women, not women as “sinners.”

    Jeff: “As for Exodus 22:25, that was part of the Old Testament Mosaic law that was fulfilled by Christ.”

    If Jesus was the fulfillment of Mosaic law, why didn’t the Jews defend him when the Romans hung him on the Cross? Didn’t they know?

    Jeff: “As was another related part where some of the harvested wheat was to be left in the field for the poor to gather.

    Is a reference too much to ask?

    Jeff: “It is not a command that extends to the New Testament Christians,”

    Darn, didn’t Pope Benedict XIV get the memo?

    VIX PERVENIT (On Usury and Other Dishonest Profit)

    http://www.ewtn.com/library/ENCYC/B14VIXPE.htm

    Maybe, unlike you, Pope Benedict actually read the New Testament.

    Matthew 5:40

    “And if anyone would sue you and take your tunic, let him have your cloak as well. 41 And if anyone forces you to go one mile, go with him two miles. 42 Give to the one who begs from you, and do not refuse the one who would borrow from you.”

    That’s a tough religion. Not only is there no mention of interest, there’s no mention of repayment.

    What’s a “New Testament Christian?” Is there an Old Testament Christian? What about a no-Testament Christian?

    Jeff: “but that could be a dissertation topic in and of itself.”

    Since you’re such a scholar, how many times is wheat mentioned in the Old Testament/Hebrew scriptures? What kind of wheat is it? Summer? Winter? Both? Please tell us everything you know about wheat in the Old Testament Hebrew scriptures.

    Jeff: “And the reference you make to Matthew 15:24 is very misleading.”

    Nope.

    Jeff: “He was testing the faith of a Gentile woman whose daughter was possessed by a demon. If you continue reading, he healed this woman’s daughter after praising her great faith. Christ himself was sent first to the Jews (he was born and raised in Israel), then to the Gentiles (the missionary work that he began in his own ministry then was followed by the Apostle Paul).”

    Then why did he stay in Israel? Why did he keep going back to Jerusalem at Passover for three straight years? If he cared so much about the Gentiles why didn’t he go to Athens, or Rome, or both?

    Jeff: “And Zach, yes, I do enjoy watching my favorite teams, the Packers and Badgers. How about that new recruit from whom the Badgers got that verbal commitment? That ought to be exciting!”

    Besides the Badgers, what other schools offered Kafentzis a scholarship?

       0 likes

  • John Casper

    Jeffrey, you wrote:

    “As a result, some of the early Christians had a problem with Paul preaching to the Gentiles (and, yes, slaves and women) because they had the problem of believing that all those groups were second-class citizens.”

    Why is pluralism possible on this issue, but not GLBT?

    Also, you keep referring to homosexuals. Are you tacitly admitting that bi-sexuality is acceptable to your God?

    FWIW, I’m an agnostic who hopes God exists. I believe the Judaeo-Christian texts are inspired. By that I mean they faithfully recount the struggle of Judaeo-Christians to grapple with their vision/image of God. As such, pluralism is a sign of strength, not weakness.

    The U.S. Constitution protects your right to believe and claim that the earth is flat. That’s consistent with what the Hebrews and everyone at that time believed. They didn’t have the scientific data to form any other opinion.

    If you think GLBT’s who want to have sex are wrong/sinful, I don’t have a problem with that.

    I have large problems with you trying to claim that the Judaeo-Christian God spoke into scripture that LGBT’s are sinful when they attempt sex within a committed relationship. It seems to me you (and a lot of others who claim to be Christian) are afraid to stand on your own two feet. So, you try to contort scripture and the Judaeo-Christian God to say what you’re afraid to say.

    The world would be a much better place if you took the allegedly religious energy you devote to demonizing LGBT’s and instead gave it to Matthew 25:

    38 And when did we see you a stranger and welcome you, or naked and clothe you? 39 And when did we see you sick or in prison and visit you?’ 40 And the King will answer them, ‘Truly, I say to you, as you did it to one of the least of these my brothers, you did it to me.’

       0 likes

Leave a Reply

  

  

  

You can use these HTML tags

<a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>

Follow us on Twitter