It was the eleventh hour of the eleventh day of the eleventh month…

The Great War, which ultimately silenced or left injured, over 37 million people, finally ended hostilities in 1918.  The “war to end all wars” concluded with a peace treaty in France, the establishment of a League of Nations, and the solemn promise that humanity would do better–it would substitute diplomacy for war, and it would usher in a new era of peace and enlightenment for all.

Following Armistice Day, was Remembrance Day–recognized on the anniversary of Armistice Day, it was a day to honor the fallen dead from the Great War.

In the United States, we celebrate “Remembrance Day” on Memorial Day (also known as Decoration Day, for the tradition of decorating fallen soldier’s graves with flowers).  Today, in the United States, we celebrate Veteran’s Day, in honor of all who have served, both living and dead.

 

In Flander’s Field by John McCrae (1919)

In Flanders fields the poppies blow
Between the crosses, row on row,
That mark our place; and in the sky
The larks, still bravely singing, fly
Scarce heard amid the guns below.

We are the Dead. Short days ago
We lived, felt dawn, saw sunset glow,
Loved and were loved, and now we lie
In Flanders fields.

Take up our quarrel with the foe:
To you from failing hands we throw
The torch; be yours to hold it high.
If ye break faith with us who die
We shall not sleep, though poppies grow
In Flanders fields.

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