The party who keeps saying that we need to think of our children’s future while cutting education, cutting safety net programs, cutting funds to the UW system, etc…it once again considering our children’s future by borrowing to fund the transportation fund:

Gov. Scott Walker plans to rely on borrowing rather than a gasoline tax increase to fund transportation projects over the next two years.

The Milwaukee Journal Sentinel reported Friday that the governor’s plan calls for $1.3 billion in borrowing for transportation, but the state’s overall borrowing would drop because Walker wants to delay construction of buildings that don’t already have initial approval, including projects in the University of Wisconsin system.

The newspaper reported that the plan will let Walker tout his opposition to raising taxes as he considers a possible run for president, but that the increased reliance on borrowing to fund highways may not go over well with his fellow Republicans who control the Legislature.

Of course his administration recommended raises the gas tax to cover any transportation fund shortfall:

Walker’s transportation secretary, Mark Gottlieb, in November recommended increasing gas taxes and vehicle fees by $751 million over two years. Walker’s office said he rejected those proposals.

But he needs to follow through on his promise to continue to lower ‘current’ taxes no matter the effect on future taxes or the future of our children. So instead of a tax and spend government economy we get a borrow and spend. At least with the former you know what the results are gonna cost you. And it even has some powerful Republicans wondering what game is afoot:

Two years ago, Walker and GOP lawmakers approved $2 billion in borrowing. About half was for buildings and maintenance and about half was for transportation. Walker’s new plan contains no new borrowing for buildings because the state has $858 million in unused bonding authority it can still use.

Sen. Alberta Darling, R-River Hills, co-chairwoman of the budget-writing Joint Finance Committee, said wants to see Walker’s overall plan before deciding how much borrowing she could support. She also said she wants to see a sustainable system for funding roads.

“The can keeps getting kicked down the road,” she said. “I’d say right now everything’s on the table.”

It’s seems like someone’s presidential campaign might just be interfering with his party’s statewide agenda.

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